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How to Write a Case Study

❶A librarian can help you locate information for your case study but should not be used as an interview subject -- unless, of course, your topic deals with library science! A copy of MeSH is available in most libraries.

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What Is A Case Study?
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These should help you gather any information you may have missed. Your case study participants were obviously experiencing some problem before they turned to your organization for a solution. Give the readers of your case study, even more, context by getting as much information about their problem as possible.

Finding out what helped your client or customer decide to work with your company is not only informative for potential new business, but it can help your organization determine what materials to publish. Talk to your customer or client and find out how your solution is helped them fix the problem that they were previously experiencing. Another relevant question to ask during your interview process is how your subject implemented your solution into their work process. This could help eliminate nerves from other potential new customers.

Results speak volumes so why not let your customer or client data do the talking for you? Remember that you may not be able to gather or showcase all the data you ask for. The next part of your process is going to involve setting up your interview. Finally, you have all of your information collected in one place. Now comes the fun part; putting it all together into the case study template you downloaded earlier. The first part of any good case study is a catchy title.

Your title should include the name of your client or customer as well as their logo. Your subhead should also be short and included information on what product or service they used that helped them solve their problem.

What does a quality title look like? You can also include a statistic or two to help illustrate the success of your case study subject. The next part of your case study should explain who your case study is about. This is where the information that you gathered from your initial questionnaire would go. In this part of the study, write about the top two to three issues that your case study participant was experiencing.

You should summarize what challenges they faced as well as their previous goals. This section of your case study is going to show off the solutions that your customers and clients use.

The final section of your case study should feature the progress that has been made since your customer or client began to use your services. This could be shown through progress towards their goals, changes in metrics they track, and more. Visuals can help add the extra oomph you need to make a great case study. It can also help make the document easier to skim. The great thing about case studies is that they are an easy piece of marketing material to tack on to any additional campaign.

The fear of creating a compelling case study is gone. You have great examples to follow and two different templates to help you format the information you gather. Breonna is a Content Writer for CoSchedule. Her specialities include social media marketing, content strategy and blogging. When not at CoSchedule, Breonna can be found running around with a cup of coffee in hand and at least 3 books stuffed in her bag.

Test every headline before you publish. What makes this such an effective content format? Consider the following points: They directly position your product as the best solution. In this case, the answer is yes. Your claims are backed up by real results. Who can argue with data from a real-life scenario? Not everyone is creating them. While blog posts are a dime a dozen, an effective customer story is much harder to duplicate. Everything you need to know about doing effective research. A simple 7-step process for creating case studies from start to finish.

Tons of examples for inspiration and templates to save you time. Getting Their Permission Step 3: Open in a separate window. Introduction Case studies are an invaluable record of the clinical practices of a profession. Additional and useful resources for chiropractic case studies include: Single subject research designs.

J Can Chirop Assoc ; 35 2: J Can Chiropr Assoc ; 51 2: General Instructions This set of guidelines provides both instructions and a template for the writing of case reports for publication.

The title page will contain the full title of the article. Remember that many people may find our article by searching on the internet. They may have to decide, just by looking at the title, whether or not they want to access the full article. A title which is vague or non-specific may not attract their attention. The two most common formats of titles are nominal and compound. Other contents for the title page should be as in the general JCCA instructions to authors. Remember that for a case study, we would not expect to have more than one or two authors.

In order to be listed as an author, a person must have an intellectual stake in the writing — at the very least they must be able to explain and even defend the article.

Someone who has only provided technical assistance, as valuable as that may be, may be acknowledged at the end of the article, but would not be listed as an author. If there is more than one author, one author must be identified as the corresponding author — the person whom people should contact if they have questions or comments about the study. Provide key words under which the article will be listed. These are the words which would be used when searching for the article using a search engine such as Medline.

When practical, we should choose key words from a standard list of keywords, such as MeSH Medical subject headings. A copy of MeSH is available in most libraries. A narrative abstract consists of a short version of the whole paper. There are no headings within the narrative abstract. The author simply tries to summarize the paper into a story which flows logically. A structured abstract uses subheadings. Structured abstracts are becoming more popular for basic scientific and clinical studies, since they standardize the abstract and ensure that certain information is included.

This is very useful for readers who search for articles on the internet. Often the abstract is displayed by a search engine, and on the basis of the abstract the reader will decide whether or not to download the full article which may require payment of a fee.

With a structured abstract, the reader is more likely to be given the information which they need to decide whether to go on to the full article, and so this style is encouraged.

The JCCA recommends the use of structured abstracts for case studies. Since they are summaries, both narrative and structured abstracts are easier to write once we have finished the rest of the article. We include a template for a structured abstract and encourage authors to make use of it. Our sub-headings will be: This consists of one or two sentences to describe the context of the case and summarize the entire article.

Several sentences describe the history and results of any examinations performed. The working diagnosis and management of the case are described. Synthesize the foregoing subsections and explain both correlations and apparent inconsistencies. If appropriate to the case, within one or two sentences describe the lessons to be learned. At the beginning of these guidelines we suggested that we need to have a clear idea of what is particularly interesting about the case we want to describe.

The introduction is where we convey this to the reader. It is useful to begin by placing the study in a historical or social context. If similar cases have been reported previously, we describe them briefly.

If there is something especially challenging about the diagnosis or management of the condition that we are describing, now is our chance to bring that out. Each time we refer to a previous study, we cite the reference usually at the end of the sentence. This is the part of the paper in which we introduce the raw data. First, we describe the complaint that brought the patient to us.

Next, we introduce the important information that we obtained from our history-taking. Also, we should try to present patient information in a narrative form — full sentences which efficiently summarize the results of our questioning.

We may or may not choose to include this list at the end of this section of the case presentation. The next step is to describe the results of our clinical examination. Again, we should write in an efficient narrative style, restricting ourselves to the relevant information. It is not necessary to include every detail in our clinical notes. If we are using a named orthopedic or neurological test, it is best to both name and describe the test since some people may know the test by a different name.

X-rays or other images are only helpful if they are clear enough to be easily reproduced and if they are accompanied by a legend. You can also begin by surfing the Internet.

Both of these sources can help you narrow your topic to a specific problem. Read on for another quiz question. You will most likely have a vastly different topic choice than that of your classmates or coworkers. While you can talk to them if you think they can help you locate additional information, you should start by conducting research on you own.

Your best interviews will come from experts in a particular field of study or customers who have implemented the tool or service that is the subject of the study. They need to be fully informed in order to provide the best possible information! While you can talk to your professor or boss for guidance, you should not formally interview them for the case study. You need to interview someone who knows about the subject but is not directly involved in your grade or performance. Even if you think a family member has knowledge on a topic, you should not interview them.

This could be considered a conflict of interest, and the information you receive may be biased as your family member may provide only the most positive information in an effort to help you. A librarian can help you locate information for your case study but should not be used as an interview subject -- unless, of course, your topic deals with library science! While some of your questions may require a simple yes or no, such as "Do you use the product? Try following up with questions such as "How do you use the product?

If they have them, ask your interviewee to bring this data to the discussion. The interviewee is taking their time to participate in your case study; you should not require any extra work from them. It is your job to find these on your own! Click on another answer to find the right one If your interviewee works for a competing company or if the data is sensitive, they may not be able to provide it to you.

Do not pressure them to give you this information. It is true that you need an introduction to start your case study. Start by raising a question, and then outline how you plan to answer that question.

Still, there are other sections of a case study as well! You absolutely want to include background information in your case study. This includes information on why your interviewees are a good sample and what makes your problem important. But keep in mind there are other sections of a case study, too! It is true that you need to present your data in a case study.

This includes what you learned in your interviews, what solutions have been tried and the opinions of the interviewees. You may need to do extra research or calculations to back up any claims. However, there are other sections of a case study besides your presentation of findings.

You definitely want to include a conclusion at the end of your case study. You should offer possible solutions but not necessarily a resolution to the case itself. Let the reader leave with an understanding of the problem and a desire to resolve it. But remember that there are there are other sections of a case study, as well.

The four main sections of a case study are introduction, background information, presentation of findings, and conclusion. You can include other sections that may be appropriate to your specific case study, if necessary. To write a case study, start with an introduction that defines key terms, outlines the problem your case study addresses, and gives necessary background information.

You can also include photos or a video if they will help your work to be more persuasive. Then, present your findings from the case study and explain your methodology, including how you used your data to come to your conclusions. In your conclusion, offer possible solutions or next steps for research, based on your results. Determine which case study type, design or style is most suitable to your intended audience. Corporations may choose illustrative case study method to show what has been done for a client; schools, educators and students may select cumulative or critical case study method and legal teams may demonstrate exploratory investigative case study method as a way to provide factual evidence.

These can be written about companies, whole countries, or even individuals. Really, if you can dream it, you can write a case study about it. Determine the topic of your case study. What have you talked about in class? Have you caught yourself coming up with questions during your reading? Look up information in books, journals, DVDs, websites, magazines, newspapers, etc. As you go through each one, take adequate notes so you can find the info later on!

Search for case studies that have been published on the same or similar subject matter. Talk to your professors, go to the library, surf the web until your bum falls asleep. When you do this, you may find there is an existing problem that needs solution, or you may find that you have to come up with an interesting idea that might or might not work in your case situation.

Review sample case studies that are similar in style and scope to get an idea of composition and format, too. Method 1 Quiz Where should you begin your case study research? Your notes on the subject. Books on your shelf. A classmate or coworker.

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A case study analysis requires you to investigate a business problem, examine the alternative solutions, and propose the most effective solution using supporting evidence. To see an annotated sample of a Case Study Analysis, click here.

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A case study should include background information on the specific topic, an analysis of the *Adapted by the Writing Center from original paper by Aimee Garten. Used by.

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In this part of the study, write about the top two to three issues that your case study participant was experiencing. You should summarize what challenges they faced as well as their previous goals. Cirque de Soleil’s case study is a great example of address problems a company faces in a case study. Therefore, before beginning to write the study itself, you should gather all of the materials relevant to the case – clinical notes, lab reports, x-rays etc. – and form a clear picture of the story that you wish to share with your profession.

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How to Write a Business Case Study 1. Determine the case study's objective and format. All business case studies are designed to demonstrate the value of your services, but they can focus on several different client objectives and take a few different forms. Nov 17,  · To write a case study, start with an introduction that defines key terms, outlines the problem your case study addresses, and gives necessary background information. You can also include photos or a video if they will help your work to be more persuasive%(22).